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Luhrs Yachts for Sale


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41 Ft Luhrs 2006

41 Convertible

Money Shot

$229,000 USD

This nicely equipped 41' Luhrs is powered by Cummins 645 Hp.HO Diesels. The Luhrs Marine Group’s goals for its 41 Convertible were simple: The boat had to be built to accommodate the offshore angler, but she also needed enough creature comforts so that a fisherman could enjoy a weeklong cruise with his family. Everwear is also used in the U-shape galley, which is up and just forward of the lounge. It’s equipped with a three-burner cooktop, stainless steel convection/microwave oven, and coffee maker, but the neatest feature is the raised wooden handholds that envelop the standard Corian countertops. Luhrs borrowed this idea from the parent company’s line of Hunter sailboats. It prevents the need to put screws into the saloon overhead for handholds and keeps dishes from sliding around on the countertops. Not only does it look good, but it’s sturdy. With plenty of storage those longer trips will accommodate all your belongings. Ultraleather L-shape lounge in the saloon, just to starboard upon entering from the cockpit. The lounge stretches outboard under the side decks and, with the touch of a button, slides out into a berth for two. Rounding out the saloon, Luhrs opted for Everwear for the saloon sole. It’s a faux teak-and-holly laminate that seems durable, and whether you’re cruising with the kids or taking a bunch of guys out for a few days offshore, you’ll appreciate that.Recent upgradesGarmin 7212 (2015)Garmin radar 18" raydome (2015)Autopilot (2016)New a/c unit (1)New turbo, Bose surround sound, LED lights, Aftercoolers cleaned and resealed, Recent engine services.

 

Come Back Story

St. Augustine’s Luhrs Corp., which built sport fishing boats on 47 acres off the San Sebastian River until its 2008 bankruptcy, has announced that new investors plan to manufacture 25- to 50-foot boats again in St. Augustine within six months.

Roger Yarborough, who will manage the new line at St. Augustine Marine on Riberia Street, said Monday that the new company will be called MB Industries — after Chief Executive Officer Mario J.T. Benedetti, a Miami investor who bought the name and production rights — but the boats will continue to be labeled as Luhrs products.

Benedetti owns a Toyota dealership in Homestead and has operated a Toyota distributorship in Venezuela for years. At one time, the 60-year-old company employed more than 400 people at its sprawling plant. This time, many Luhrs boats will be made from the original molds, but there will be some prototypes built as well, Yarborough said.

“We can then build them as it naturally needs to be done,” he said. “We’ll be adding people. There are some people (who once worked on Luhrs boats) still here. We’ve also received a lot of calls from former dealers, wanting to come back.” He does not know yet how many workers he will hire for this plant. City Manager John Regan was the first to break the news locally, though the decision to come back to the city had been released previously at www.luhrs.com. “We have a 450-year boat building history in this community. It’s very exciting,” Regan said, adding that city officials will assist the company any way they can. I understand that at first there will be limited production demand.”

Luhrs’ St. Augustine plant, multiple buildings surrounded by overgrown brush, is shuttered while the property goes through bankruptcy proceedings. The usual reason given for Luhrs’ going under is the economy, but that suggests tough times where buyers tighten their belts and don’t buy boats.

Yarborough said that’s one reason, but another is that boat manufacturers distribute their boats to dealers with a provision to buy them back if they don’t sell. “When you have 100 boats (for sale at dealers) at $400,000 each, that means (if they don’t sell) the manufacturer must come up with millions of dollars,” he said.

Luhrs Corp. was once under the umbrella of the now-defunct Luhrs Marine Group, which had its headquarters and main manufacturing plant at Millville, N.J., and which declared bankruptcy in September 2007. It ceased operations in January 2008.

The other companies under Luhrs Marine were Silverton Marine Corp., Mainship Corp. and Hunter Marine Corp. All were sold in the bankruptcy filing. “Nobody bought any property. They just bought the company,” Yarborough said.

Hunter Marine, which manufactures sailboats, had been the only one that remained in business. Its new owner lives in Alachua, just north of Gainesville.

An investor group in New Jersey bought Silverton and another buyer bought Luhrs and Mainship. Benedetti bought the company from that person.

“St. Augustine Marine had made major modifications to his (Luhrs) boat,” Yarborough said. “He liked the boat and the company and wanted to bring it back to St. Augustine. He plans a major marketing campaign.”

The company’s announcement said that a group of “naval engineers, marine architects and entrepreneurs who are passionate about boats” plan to manufacture them “with the highest quality, craftsmanship and seaworthiness.”